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{ Tag Archives } Programming

Reinventing the Wheel: How to Average Numbers

Other the past week I’ve been writing some code for work that has to happen periodically and then re-schedule itself so it can happen again. We never want two of this process running, and we want the process to automagically expand its time window if it takes longer than we think it should, because arbitrary […]

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Getting TracRedirect to work with Trac 0.11rc1

I’m a big fan of Trac, and I use it for project management when I’m given the choice. It has a few issues, but nothing a little plugin magic can’t fix. On of my favorite plugins is TracRedirect, which allows me to make one page point to another and make the browser redirect there, so […]

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Centering a Window Via AppleScript

John Siracusa recently lamented the loss of one of his classic OS add-ons; the ability to center the current window onscreen via a global key combo. Well, the global key combo can be had in any number of ways, but here’s an AppleScript that’ll do it for you. It finds the screen size using the […]

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Lazy Decision Making

We recently cleaned out my parents’ garage so that it could be torn down to make room for an intergalactic expressway a storm drain. Amongst the millions of childhood memorabilia was this book, which was the first taste I got of computer programming. It taught us Apple BASIC, and we used it to program our […]

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Alan Kay’s ’97 OOPSLA Keynote

JavaScript is the new Smalltalk: Regular readers are quite tired of me pointing to this video, Alan Kay: The Computer Revolution hasn’t happend yet. Keynote OOPSLA 1997, but I think it’s quite fundamental to understand that Alan Kay had a vision for the web, and though his understanding of the role of HTML in the […]

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Are Features The Enemy?

The Software Conspiracy: If a computer magazine publishes a roundup of word processors, the central piece of that article will be the “feature matrix,” a table showing what word processing programs have which features. With just a glance, the reader can quickly see which word processors have the richest sets of features, and which have […]

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Simulating HttpContext with Sessions and POSTs for ASP.NET

Here’s a little something I’ve been hacking together at work, so that we can do some unit testing on my current project. It’s largely based on this post by Phil Haack, but adds support for using Sessions (by assigning to the Session property) and doing Http POSTs as well as GETs, both of which are […]

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Twelve Benefits of Writing Unit Tests First

Twelve Benefits of Writing Unit Tests First: How do you solve a software problem? How do they teach you to handle it in school? What’s the first thing you do? You think about how to solve it. You ask, “What code will I write to generate a solution?” But that’s backward. The first thing you […]

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Larry Gonick Math Cartoons

Larry Gonick, Cartoonist of Awesome Stuff: Larry Gonick, creator of the various Cartoon History of the Whatevers, has a series of mathematical cartoons that explain things like warp drives and chaos theory. Great stuff. (Via Coding Horror.)

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Operator Overloading

Something that had been bothering me for a month just clicked in my brain and I had to write it down before it wandered off somewhere. No one who regularly reads this blog will understand, but here goes. C++ has operator overloading that leads to code that no one understands. If I define a class […]

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