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{ Tag Archives } Computing

Limitations

The most important part about the iPad are its limitations. But they’re important not because it defines what the device “can’t do”; in the fullness of time the App Store will likely bring us all sorts of new and interesting workarounds to the limitations. Rather, the limitations are important because it delineates the boundaries of […]

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Reinventing the Wheel: How to Average Numbers

Other the past week I’ve been writing some code for work that has to happen periodically and then re-schedule itself so it can happen again. We never want two of this process running, and we want the process to automagically expand its time window if it takes longer than we think it should, because arbitrary […]

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Centering a Window Via AppleScript

John Siracusa recently lamented the loss of one of his classic OS add-ons; the ability to center the current window onscreen via a global key combo. Well, the global key combo can be had in any number of ways, but here’s an AppleScript that’ll do it for you. It finds the screen size using the […]

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Alan Kay’s ’97 OOPSLA Keynote

JavaScript is the new Smalltalk: Regular readers are quite tired of me pointing to this video, Alan Kay: The Computer Revolution hasn’t happend yet. Keynote OOPSLA 1997, but I think it’s quite fundamental to understand that Alan Kay had a vision for the web, and though his understanding of the role of HTML in the […]

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REST, née Semantic Web

I keep hearing about the Semantic Web, and it occurs to me that I still don’t undersand. Isn’t this just REST? In the semantic web, you put up a document and name some parts of it, using RDF. Those parts are the “things they’re about,” which is what’s important. Then you link different things together […]

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Are Features The Enemy?

The Software Conspiracy: If a computer magazine publishes a roundup of word processors, the central piece of that article will be the “feature matrix,” a table showing what word processing programs have which features. With just a glance, the reader can quickly see which word processors have the richest sets of features, and which have […]

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The Non-Maximizing Maximize Button

The Non-Maximizing Maximize Button: That’s my problem with Apple’s non-maximizing maximize button. Allowing users to maximize any window to a monitor has its problems, to be sure. But Apple’s method of forcing users to deal with more windows by preventing maximization is not good user interface design. It is fundamentally and deeply flawed. Users don’t […]

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Economies and Fire Trucks

Introduction to Tog on Software Design, On our economy as a firetruck: If we are to achieve the promise of the future, we must stop using the front steering wheel of our fire truck like the floating pointer of a Ouija board, as we all fight to steer at once. We need to replace random […]

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Twelve Benefits of Writing Unit Tests First

Twelve Benefits of Writing Unit Tests First: How do you solve a software problem? How do they teach you to handle it in school? What’s the first thing you do? You think about how to solve it. You ask, “What code will I write to generate a solution?” But that’s backward. The first thing you […]

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Operator Overloading

Something that had been bothering me for a month just clicked in my brain and I had to write it down before it wandered off somewhere. No one who regularly reads this blog will understand, but here goes. C++ has operator overloading that leads to code that no one understands. If I define a class […]

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